Vacuolar processing enzymes, AmVPE1 and AmVPE2, as potential executors of ethylene regulated programmed cell death in the lace plant (aponogeton madagascariensis)

Gaolathe Rantong, Arunika H.L.A.N. Gunawardena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Perforation formation in Aponogeton madagascariensis (Mirb.) H.Bruggen (lace plant) is an excellent model for studying developmentally regulated programmed cell death (PCD). In this study, we isolated and identified two lace plant vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) and investigated their involvement in PCD and throughout leaf development. Lace plant VPE transcript levels were determined during seven different stages of leaf development. PCD and non-PCD cells from “window” stage leaves (in which perforations are forming) were separated through laser-capture microscopy and their transcript levels were also determined. VPE activity was also studied between the cell types, through a VPE activity-based probe JOPD1. Additionally, VPE transcript levels were studied in plants treated with an ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor, aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The two isolated VPEs, AmVPE1 and AmVPE2, are vegetative type VPEs. AmVPE1 had higher transcript levels during a pre-perforation developmental stage, immediately prior to visible signs of PCD. AmVPE2 transcript levels were higher later during window and late window stages. Both VPEs had higher transcript and activity levels in PCD compared with the non-PCD cells. AVG treatment inhibited PCD and associated increases in VPE transcript levels. Our results suggested that VPEs are involved in the execution of the ethylene-related PCD in the lace plant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-247
Number of pages13
JournalBotany
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Plant Science

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