Technical evaluations of carbon capture options for power generation from coal and biomass based on integrated gasification combined cycle scheme

Calin Cristian Cormos, Anamaria Padurean, Paul Serban Agachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a technology for power generation in which the feedstock is partially oxidized with oxygen and steam to produce syngas. In a conventional IGCC design without carbon capture, the syngas is purified for dust and hydrogen sulphide removal and then sent to a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) for power production. The hot GT flue gases are sent to Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) for steam generation. Additional power is produces by expanding the steam generated in a steam turbine. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are expected to play a significant role in the coming decades for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle is one of the power generation technologies having the highest potential to capture carbon dioxide with the low penalties in term of plant energy efficiency and cost. The modification of the IGCC design for carbon capture can be done in various plant concepts considering the carbon capture method to be used (e.g. pre- and post-combustion capture, syngas chemical looping etc.). This paper investigates various carbon capture methods suitable to be applied for an IGCC plant for power generation. The coal blended with biomass (sawdust) based IGCC case study investigated in the paper produces around 400 - 500 MW net electricity with more than 90 % carbon capture rate. An important focus of the paper is concentrated on overall energy efficiency optimization of the IGCC plant concepts with various carbon capture options by better heat and power integration of the main plant sub-systems (e.g. steam integration between gasification island, syngas conditioning line and the steam cycle, influence of heat and power demand for Acid Gas Removal unit etc.). A particular attention of the paper is focused on the quality specification for the captured carbon dioxide stream considering various capture options but also the storage options (enhanced oil recovery, storage in depleted oil and gas fields, saline aquifers etc.).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1861-1868
Number of pages8
JournalEnergy Procedia
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2011

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Carbon capture
Gasification
Power generation
Biomass
Coal
Steam
Energy efficiency
Carbon dioxide
Sawdust
Steam generators
Waste heat utilization
Steam turbines
Gas emissions
Gases
Aquifers
Flue gases
Greenhouse gases
Feedstocks
Gas turbines
Dust

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Energy(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a technology for power generation in which the feedstock is partially oxidized with oxygen and steam to produce syngas. In a conventional IGCC design without carbon capture, the syngas is purified for dust and hydrogen sulphide removal and then sent to a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) for power production. The hot GT flue gases are sent to Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) for steam generation. Additional power is produces by expanding the steam generated in a steam turbine. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are expected to play a significant role in the coming decades for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle is one of the power generation technologies having the highest potential to capture carbon dioxide with the low penalties in term of plant energy efficiency and cost. The modification of the IGCC design for carbon capture can be done in various plant concepts considering the carbon capture method to be used (e.g. pre- and post-combustion capture, syngas chemical looping etc.). This paper investigates various carbon capture methods suitable to be applied for an IGCC plant for power generation. The coal blended with biomass (sawdust) based IGCC case study investigated in the paper produces around 400 - 500 MW net electricity with more than 90 {\%} carbon capture rate. An important focus of the paper is concentrated on overall energy efficiency optimization of the IGCC plant concepts with various carbon capture options by better heat and power integration of the main plant sub-systems (e.g. steam integration between gasification island, syngas conditioning line and the steam cycle, influence of heat and power demand for Acid Gas Removal unit etc.). A particular attention of the paper is focused on the quality specification for the captured carbon dioxide stream considering various capture options but also the storage options (enhanced oil recovery, storage in depleted oil and gas fields, saline aquifers etc.).",
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Technical evaluations of carbon capture options for power generation from coal and biomass based on integrated gasification combined cycle scheme. / Cormos, Calin Cristian; Padurean, Anamaria; Agachi, Paul Serban.

In: Energy Procedia, Vol. 4, 01.01.2011, p. 1861-1868.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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