Sintering and heat-treatment of injection moulded 440K-type martensitic stainless steel compacts

M. Yousaf Anwar, Shepherd Bhero, P. F. Messer, H. A. Davies

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Sintering and heat treatment of injection moulded hardenable stainless steel powder (440Ktype) compacts has been studied. The binder system, known as the Sheffield Binder System, was used, which is comprised of two polymers, a major component of water soluble polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and a minor component of very finely dispersed polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) derived from an emulsion. Mixing of a number of different feedstocks was carried out manually. Following the identification of the optimum binder composition (20 wt. % PMMA, 80 wt. % PEGs) and solid loading (68 Vol. %), several test specimens were injection moulded for further processing. The PEGs were removed by leaching with water. The PMMA was removed by pyrolysis, prior to the sintering stage. Samples were sintered to ~ 99% of theoretical density. With careful control of the various processing parameters, including sintering temperature and time, cooling rate and heat treatment conditions, good mechanical properties including high hardness of HRC 60 were attained. In an attempt to reduce the process cycle time, the sintering ramp was modified to include solutionising and oil-quenching in a single sintering cycle. The hardened samples were tempered at temperatures from 150 to 350 °C for 2 hours. Scanning electron microscopy was used to reveal the micro-structural changes during various sintering and heat-treatment stages.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the Euro International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008
    PublisherEuropean Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA)
    Pages215-220
    Number of pages6
    Volume2
    ISBN (Print)9781899072033
    Publication statusPublished - 2008
    EventEuropean International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008 - Mannheim, Germany
    Duration: Sep 29 2008Oct 1 2008

    Other

    OtherEuropean International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008
    CountryGermany
    CityMannheim
    Period9/29/0810/1/08

    Fingerprint

    martensitic stainless steels
    Martensitic stainless steel
    sintering
    heat treatment
    Sintering
    Heat treatment
    injection
    Polymethyl Methacrylate
    Polymethyl methacrylates
    polymethyl methacrylate
    Polyethylene glycols
    Binders
    glycols
    polyethylenes
    cycles
    Water
    Stainless Steel
    leaching
    Processing
    ramps

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Mechanics of Materials
    • Ceramics and Composites
    • Materials Chemistry
    • Metals and Alloys
    • Condensed Matter Physics

    Cite this

    Yousaf Anwar, M., Bhero, S., Messer, P. F., & Davies, H. A. (2008). Sintering and heat-treatment of injection moulded 440K-type martensitic stainless steel compacts. In Proceedings of the Euro International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008 (Vol. 2, pp. 215-220). European Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA).
    Yousaf Anwar, M. ; Bhero, Shepherd ; Messer, P. F. ; Davies, H. A. / Sintering and heat-treatment of injection moulded 440K-type martensitic stainless steel compacts. Proceedings of the Euro International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008. Vol. 2 European Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA), 2008. pp. 215-220
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    abstract = "Sintering and heat treatment of injection moulded hardenable stainless steel powder (440Ktype) compacts has been studied. The binder system, known as the Sheffield Binder System, was used, which is comprised of two polymers, a major component of water soluble polyethylene glycols (PEGs) and a minor component of very finely dispersed polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) derived from an emulsion. Mixing of a number of different feedstocks was carried out manually. Following the identification of the optimum binder composition (20 wt. {\%} PMMA, 80 wt. {\%} PEGs) and solid loading (68 Vol. {\%}), several test specimens were injection moulded for further processing. The PEGs were removed by leaching with water. The PMMA was removed by pyrolysis, prior to the sintering stage. Samples were sintered to ~ 99{\%} of theoretical density. With careful control of the various processing parameters, including sintering temperature and time, cooling rate and heat treatment conditions, good mechanical properties including high hardness of HRC 60 were attained. In an attempt to reduce the process cycle time, the sintering ramp was modified to include solutionising and oil-quenching in a single sintering cycle. The hardened samples were tempered at temperatures from 150 to 350 °C for 2 hours. Scanning electron microscopy was used to reveal the micro-structural changes during various sintering and heat-treatment stages.",
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    Yousaf Anwar, M, Bhero, S, Messer, PF & Davies, HA 2008, Sintering and heat-treatment of injection moulded 440K-type martensitic stainless steel compacts. in Proceedings of the Euro International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008. vol. 2, European Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA), pp. 215-220, European International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008, Mannheim, Germany, 9/29/08.

    Sintering and heat-treatment of injection moulded 440K-type martensitic stainless steel compacts. / Yousaf Anwar, M.; Bhero, Shepherd; Messer, P. F.; Davies, H. A.

    Proceedings of the Euro International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008. Vol. 2 European Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA), 2008. p. 215-220.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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    Yousaf Anwar M, Bhero S, Messer PF, Davies HA. Sintering and heat-treatment of injection moulded 440K-type martensitic stainless steel compacts. In Proceedings of the Euro International Powder Metallurgy Congress and Exhibition, Euro PM 2008. Vol. 2. European Powder Metallurgy Association (EPMA). 2008. p. 215-220