Prospective synergy of biogas upgrading technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) techniques

Jonathan Empompo Bambokela, Edison Muzenda, Mohamed Belaid

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The alternatives options pertaining to the use of separated impurities such as carbon dioxide (CO2) have attracted high interest over the recent years. CO2 utilization is offering many additional economic benefits to biogas upgrading technologies. By means of these technologies, the separated CO2 can be used for various purposes as an eco-friendly and financially sustainable product in enhanced oil recovery (EOR), algae production, mineralization and carbon sequestration. On the one hand, the anthropogenic climate change and the mitigation thereof are the main reasons of the increasing interest for CCS technologies. On the other hand, the financial aspect of upgrading technologies is still an important criterion always considered before the commencement of projects due to the production of impurities. To optimize the economic viability of biogas, this study proposes a synergy between biogas upgrading and CCS technologies to generate tremendous benefits in the future. This study aims at promoting the deployment of biogas and CO2 utilization to avail governmental incentives and subsidies in order to eradicate present hurdles in the energy sector.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3236-3249
Number of pages14
JournalProceedings of the International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management
Volume2018
Issue numberJUL
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Event2nd European International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management.IEOM 2018 -
Duration: Jul 26 2018Jul 27 2018

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Strategy and Management
  • Management Science and Operations Research
  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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