Integrating general education courses into engineering curriculum

Students' perspective

Jacek Uziak, M. Tunde Oladiran, Venkata Parasuram Kommula

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

General Education Courses (GEC) are natural sources of "soft" skills in engineering curricula. Such skills are becoming increasingly important if the graduates are to operate successfully and be fully integrated in their workplaces. The importance of "soft" skills is fully recognized by engineering accreditation boards. The chapter reports on the engineering students' reactions to the introduction of GEC at the University of Botswana (UB). The position of engineering students' on the issue of GEC is not very clear. The questionnaire administered to final year students in all engineering programmes at UB gave a mixed response. On average, there were 25% neutral answers to the questions in the survey. The fact that on average one quarter of all graduating engineers did not have an opinion about GEC and their implementation was very disappointing and showed the general problem of students not being interested in that area of their study. The survey showed that students were not fully convinced that GEC were either important or relevant to their future career. The fundamental question on whether GEC were a necessary part of engineering programme brought almost an equal split between positive, negative, and neutral answers, with a slight advantage of positive answers (37%) over negative ones (33%). The students were equally split (36% positive and negative answers) on the question of whether.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDevelopments in Engineering Education Standards
Subtitle of host publicationAdvanced Curriculum Innovations
PublisherIGI Global
Pages247-262
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9781466609518
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

general education
Curricula
Education
Students
engineering
curriculum
student
Botswana
Accreditation
accreditation
engineer
workplace
graduate
career
Engineers
questionnaire

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Uziak, J., Oladiran, M. T., & Kommula, V. P. (2012). Integrating general education courses into engineering curriculum: Students' perspective. In Developments in Engineering Education Standards: Advanced Curriculum Innovations (pp. 247-262). IGI Global. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0951-8.ch014
Uziak, Jacek ; Oladiran, M. Tunde ; Kommula, Venkata Parasuram. / Integrating general education courses into engineering curriculum : Students' perspective. Developments in Engineering Education Standards: Advanced Curriculum Innovations. IGI Global, 2012. pp. 247-262
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Uziak, J, Oladiran, MT & Kommula, VP 2012, Integrating general education courses into engineering curriculum: Students' perspective. in Developments in Engineering Education Standards: Advanced Curriculum Innovations. IGI Global, pp. 247-262. https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0951-8.ch014

Integrating general education courses into engineering curriculum : Students' perspective. / Uziak, Jacek; Oladiran, M. Tunde; Kommula, Venkata Parasuram.

Developments in Engineering Education Standards: Advanced Curriculum Innovations. IGI Global, 2012. p. 247-262.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Uziak J, Oladiran MT, Kommula VP. Integrating general education courses into engineering curriculum: Students' perspective. In Developments in Engineering Education Standards: Advanced Curriculum Innovations. IGI Global. 2012. p. 247-262 https://doi.org/10.4018/978-1-4666-0951-8.ch014