Gender variation in self-reported likelihood of HIV infection in comparison with HIV test results in rural and urban Nigeria

Adeniyi F. Fagbamigbe, Joshua O. Akinyemi, Babatunde O. Adedokun, Elijah A. Bamgboye

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Behaviour change which is highly influenced by risk perception is a major challenge that HIV prevention efforts need to confront. In this study, we examined the validity of self-reported likelihood of HIV infection among rural and urban reproductive age group Nigerians.Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of Nigerians. We investigated the concordance between self-reported likelihood of HIV and actual results of HIV test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess whether selected respondents' characteristics affect the validity of self-reports.Results: The HIV prevalence in the urban population was 3.8% (3.1% among males and 4.6% among females) and 3.5% in the rural areas (3.4% among males and 3.7% among females). Almost all the respondents who claimed they have high chances of being infected with HIV actually tested negative (91.6% in urban and 97.9% in rural areas). In contrast, only 8.5% in urban areas and 2.1% in rural areas, of those who claimed high chances of been HIV infected were actually HIV positive. About 2.9% and 4.3% from urban and rural areas respectively tested positive although they claimed very low chances of HIV infection. Age, gender, education and residence are factors associated with validity of respondents' self-perceived risk of HIV infection.Conclusion: Self-perceived HIV risk is poorly sensitive and moderately specific in the prediction of HIV status. There are differences in the validity of self-perceived risk of HIV across rural and urban populations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number44
JournalAIDS Research and Therapy
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 21 2011

Fingerprint

Nigeria
HIV Infections
HIV
Urban Population
Rural Population
Self Report
Age Groups
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Virology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

@article{9ad50308a2ff423984df1aeb2105cd6e,
title = "Gender variation in self-reported likelihood of HIV infection in comparison with HIV test results in rural and urban Nigeria",
abstract = "Background: Behaviour change which is highly influenced by risk perception is a major challenge that HIV prevention efforts need to confront. In this study, we examined the validity of self-reported likelihood of HIV infection among rural and urban reproductive age group Nigerians.Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of Nigerians. We investigated the concordance between self-reported likelihood of HIV and actual results of HIV test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess whether selected respondents' characteristics affect the validity of self-reports.Results: The HIV prevalence in the urban population was 3.8{\%} (3.1{\%} among males and 4.6{\%} among females) and 3.5{\%} in the rural areas (3.4{\%} among males and 3.7{\%} among females). Almost all the respondents who claimed they have high chances of being infected with HIV actually tested negative (91.6{\%} in urban and 97.9{\%} in rural areas). In contrast, only 8.5{\%} in urban areas and 2.1{\%} in rural areas, of those who claimed high chances of been HIV infected were actually HIV positive. About 2.9{\%} and 4.3{\%} from urban and rural areas respectively tested positive although they claimed very low chances of HIV infection. Age, gender, education and residence are factors associated with validity of respondents' self-perceived risk of HIV infection.Conclusion: Self-perceived HIV risk is poorly sensitive and moderately specific in the prediction of HIV status. There are differences in the validity of self-perceived risk of HIV across rural and urban populations.",
author = "Fagbamigbe, {Adeniyi F.} and Akinyemi, {Joshua O.} and Adedokun, {Babatunde O.} and Bamgboye, {Elijah A.}",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1186/1742-6405-8-44",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "AIDS Research and Therapy",
issn = "1742-6405",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

Gender variation in self-reported likelihood of HIV infection in comparison with HIV test results in rural and urban Nigeria. / Fagbamigbe, Adeniyi F.; Akinyemi, Joshua O.; Adedokun, Babatunde O.; Bamgboye, Elijah A.

In: AIDS Research and Therapy, Vol. 8, 44, 21.12.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender variation in self-reported likelihood of HIV infection in comparison with HIV test results in rural and urban Nigeria

AU - Fagbamigbe, Adeniyi F.

AU - Akinyemi, Joshua O.

AU - Adedokun, Babatunde O.

AU - Bamgboye, Elijah A.

PY - 2011/12/21

Y1 - 2011/12/21

N2 - Background: Behaviour change which is highly influenced by risk perception is a major challenge that HIV prevention efforts need to confront. In this study, we examined the validity of self-reported likelihood of HIV infection among rural and urban reproductive age group Nigerians.Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of Nigerians. We investigated the concordance between self-reported likelihood of HIV and actual results of HIV test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess whether selected respondents' characteristics affect the validity of self-reports.Results: The HIV prevalence in the urban population was 3.8% (3.1% among males and 4.6% among females) and 3.5% in the rural areas (3.4% among males and 3.7% among females). Almost all the respondents who claimed they have high chances of being infected with HIV actually tested negative (91.6% in urban and 97.9% in rural areas). In contrast, only 8.5% in urban areas and 2.1% in rural areas, of those who claimed high chances of been HIV infected were actually HIV positive. About 2.9% and 4.3% from urban and rural areas respectively tested positive although they claimed very low chances of HIV infection. Age, gender, education and residence are factors associated with validity of respondents' self-perceived risk of HIV infection.Conclusion: Self-perceived HIV risk is poorly sensitive and moderately specific in the prediction of HIV status. There are differences in the validity of self-perceived risk of HIV across rural and urban populations.

AB - Background: Behaviour change which is highly influenced by risk perception is a major challenge that HIV prevention efforts need to confront. In this study, we examined the validity of self-reported likelihood of HIV infection among rural and urban reproductive age group Nigerians.Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of a nationally representative sample of Nigerians. We investigated the concordance between self-reported likelihood of HIV and actual results of HIV test. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess whether selected respondents' characteristics affect the validity of self-reports.Results: The HIV prevalence in the urban population was 3.8% (3.1% among males and 4.6% among females) and 3.5% in the rural areas (3.4% among males and 3.7% among females). Almost all the respondents who claimed they have high chances of being infected with HIV actually tested negative (91.6% in urban and 97.9% in rural areas). In contrast, only 8.5% in urban areas and 2.1% in rural areas, of those who claimed high chances of been HIV infected were actually HIV positive. About 2.9% and 4.3% from urban and rural areas respectively tested positive although they claimed very low chances of HIV infection. Age, gender, education and residence are factors associated with validity of respondents' self-perceived risk of HIV infection.Conclusion: Self-perceived HIV risk is poorly sensitive and moderately specific in the prediction of HIV status. There are differences in the validity of self-perceived risk of HIV across rural and urban populations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=83755196666&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=83755196666&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/1742-6405-8-44

DO - 10.1186/1742-6405-8-44

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - AIDS Research and Therapy

JF - AIDS Research and Therapy

SN - 1742-6405

M1 - 44

ER -