Electromagnetic levitation Part I

Theoretical and experimental considerations

Sayavur I. Bakhtiyarov, Dennis A. Siginer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Levitation of liquid bodies against gravity is a contactless confinement process appropriate for manufacturing very pure materials. A variety of levitation techniques have been developed over the last few decades, such as aerodynamic, acoustic, electrostatic, microwave, and electromagnetic levitations. More recently, a new generation of novel techniques, essentially combinations of the established primary techniques, has been successfully introduced. Examples are acoustic-electric, aerodynamic-acoustic and acoustic-electromagnetic. The purpose of this series of papers in three parts, Bakhtiyarov and Siginer (2007a,b), is to review the advances in electromagnetic levitation (EML) since its introduction as a containerless melting technique, and a tool for the determination of the thermophysical properties of molten metals under both terrestrial and microgravity conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99-112
Number of pages14
JournalFluid Dynamics and Materials Processing
Volume4
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2008

Fingerprint

Acoustics
Aerodynamics
Microgravity
Liquid metals
Electrostatics
Gravitation
Melting
Thermodynamic properties
Microwaves
Liquids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

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Electromagnetic levitation Part I : Theoretical and experimental considerations. / Bakhtiyarov, Sayavur I.; Siginer, Dennis A.

In: Fluid Dynamics and Materials Processing, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.06.2008, p. 99-112.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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