Detection and molecular characterisation of group A rotavirus from children in northern Botswana

L. P. Kebaabetswe, T. K. Sebunya, M. I. Matsheka, T. Ndung'u

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the presence of group A rotavirus in human stool samples in northern Botswana and to characterise the circulating strains. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: The University of Botswana and Botswana-Havard Partnership for HIV Research. Subjects: A total of 210 stool samples was collected; 104 from hospitalised and 106 from non-hospitalised children, five years and below suffering from gastroenteritis. Results: Out of 210 diarrhoea stool samples collected, 27 (13%) tested positive for group A rotavirus. There was a higher prevalence of infection in hospitalised children (63%) as compared to the non-hospitalised ones (37%). Most rotavirus infections occurred in the age 24 months and below. Of the 13 samples which were positive by PAGE, the predominant electrophoretic pattern detected was the short (S) electrophoretype 9/13 (69%) followed by the long (L) electrophoretype 4/13 (31%). The following G types were detected; G2 (17%), G3 (22%). mixed infections found were G1+G2 (5.6%), G1+G8 (22%), G3+G9 (27.8%) and G1+G3+G9 (5.6%). P[6] was the only VP 4 genotype detected. Rotavirus strains G3P[6] and G3+G9P[6] were identified as the circulating strains in north Botswana. Conclusion: The detection of uncommon rotavirus strains and the high proportion of mixed infections suggest a greater diversity of rotavirus infections among children in Botswana than previously reported. Our study reveals a complex epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection in Botswana that may require further molecular characterisation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)203-208
Number of pages6
JournalEast African Medical Journal
Volume82
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

Fingerprint

Botswana
Rotavirus
Rotavirus Infections
Coinfection
Hospitalized Child
Gastroenteritis
Diarrhea
Cross-Sectional Studies
Genotype
HIV
Infection
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Kebaabetswe, L. P. ; Sebunya, T. K. ; Matsheka, M. I. ; Ndung'u, T. / Detection and molecular characterisation of group A rotavirus from children in northern Botswana. In: East African Medical Journal. 2005 ; Vol. 82, No. 4. pp. 203-208.
@article{dc94c2bb9c964335914b67922bea0023,
title = "Detection and molecular characterisation of group A rotavirus from children in northern Botswana",
abstract = "Objectives: To determine the presence of group A rotavirus in human stool samples in northern Botswana and to characterise the circulating strains. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: The University of Botswana and Botswana-Havard Partnership for HIV Research. Subjects: A total of 210 stool samples was collected; 104 from hospitalised and 106 from non-hospitalised children, five years and below suffering from gastroenteritis. Results: Out of 210 diarrhoea stool samples collected, 27 (13{\%}) tested positive for group A rotavirus. There was a higher prevalence of infection in hospitalised children (63{\%}) as compared to the non-hospitalised ones (37{\%}). Most rotavirus infections occurred in the age 24 months and below. Of the 13 samples which were positive by PAGE, the predominant electrophoretic pattern detected was the short (S) electrophoretype 9/13 (69{\%}) followed by the long (L) electrophoretype 4/13 (31{\%}). The following G types were detected; G2 (17{\%}), G3 (22{\%}). mixed infections found were G1+G2 (5.6{\%}), G1+G8 (22{\%}), G3+G9 (27.8{\%}) and G1+G3+G9 (5.6{\%}). P[6] was the only VP 4 genotype detected. Rotavirus strains G3P[6] and G3+G9P[6] were identified as the circulating strains in north Botswana. Conclusion: The detection of uncommon rotavirus strains and the high proportion of mixed infections suggest a greater diversity of rotavirus infections among children in Botswana than previously reported. Our study reveals a complex epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection in Botswana that may require further molecular characterisation.",
author = "Kebaabetswe, {L. P.} and Sebunya, {T. K.} and Matsheka, {M. I.} and T. Ndung'u",
year = "2005",
month = "4",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "203--208",
journal = "East African Medical Journal",
issn = "0012-835X",
publisher = "East African Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

Detection and molecular characterisation of group A rotavirus from children in northern Botswana. / Kebaabetswe, L. P.; Sebunya, T. K.; Matsheka, M. I.; Ndung'u, T.

In: East African Medical Journal, Vol. 82, No. 4, 04.2005, p. 203-208.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Detection and molecular characterisation of group A rotavirus from children in northern Botswana

AU - Kebaabetswe, L. P.

AU - Sebunya, T. K.

AU - Matsheka, M. I.

AU - Ndung'u, T.

PY - 2005/4

Y1 - 2005/4

N2 - Objectives: To determine the presence of group A rotavirus in human stool samples in northern Botswana and to characterise the circulating strains. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: The University of Botswana and Botswana-Havard Partnership for HIV Research. Subjects: A total of 210 stool samples was collected; 104 from hospitalised and 106 from non-hospitalised children, five years and below suffering from gastroenteritis. Results: Out of 210 diarrhoea stool samples collected, 27 (13%) tested positive for group A rotavirus. There was a higher prevalence of infection in hospitalised children (63%) as compared to the non-hospitalised ones (37%). Most rotavirus infections occurred in the age 24 months and below. Of the 13 samples which were positive by PAGE, the predominant electrophoretic pattern detected was the short (S) electrophoretype 9/13 (69%) followed by the long (L) electrophoretype 4/13 (31%). The following G types were detected; G2 (17%), G3 (22%). mixed infections found were G1+G2 (5.6%), G1+G8 (22%), G3+G9 (27.8%) and G1+G3+G9 (5.6%). P[6] was the only VP 4 genotype detected. Rotavirus strains G3P[6] and G3+G9P[6] were identified as the circulating strains in north Botswana. Conclusion: The detection of uncommon rotavirus strains and the high proportion of mixed infections suggest a greater diversity of rotavirus infections among children in Botswana than previously reported. Our study reveals a complex epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection in Botswana that may require further molecular characterisation.

AB - Objectives: To determine the presence of group A rotavirus in human stool samples in northern Botswana and to characterise the circulating strains. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: The University of Botswana and Botswana-Havard Partnership for HIV Research. Subjects: A total of 210 stool samples was collected; 104 from hospitalised and 106 from non-hospitalised children, five years and below suffering from gastroenteritis. Results: Out of 210 diarrhoea stool samples collected, 27 (13%) tested positive for group A rotavirus. There was a higher prevalence of infection in hospitalised children (63%) as compared to the non-hospitalised ones (37%). Most rotavirus infections occurred in the age 24 months and below. Of the 13 samples which were positive by PAGE, the predominant electrophoretic pattern detected was the short (S) electrophoretype 9/13 (69%) followed by the long (L) electrophoretype 4/13 (31%). The following G types were detected; G2 (17%), G3 (22%). mixed infections found were G1+G2 (5.6%), G1+G8 (22%), G3+G9 (27.8%) and G1+G3+G9 (5.6%). P[6] was the only VP 4 genotype detected. Rotavirus strains G3P[6] and G3+G9P[6] were identified as the circulating strains in north Botswana. Conclusion: The detection of uncommon rotavirus strains and the high proportion of mixed infections suggest a greater diversity of rotavirus infections among children in Botswana than previously reported. Our study reveals a complex epidemiological profile of rotavirus infection in Botswana that may require further molecular characterisation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=26944473688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=26944473688&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 16122089

AN - SCOPUS:26944473688

VL - 82

SP - 203

EP - 208

JO - East African Medical Journal

JF - East African Medical Journal

SN - 0012-835X

IS - 4

ER -