A review of the application of gis in biomass and solid waste supply chain optimization: Gaps and opportunities for developing nations

Gratitude Charis, Gwiranai Danha, Edison Muzenda

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The application of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) enhanced modelling techniques in biomass and solid waste supply chain problems is hinged on a common denominator for both systems: the spatial distribution of supply points and vari-ability of resource quantities. Since the sustainability of bioenergy or waste-to-en-ergy projects around these resources will be affected significantly by the cost of supplying them, it is important to optimize decisions around facility location, size and transport routes. GIS is an important tool that can be used to capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of the biomass and waste. It can then be used alone or integrated with other software tools, for strategic and tactical level optimization of biomass and solid waste supply chains. In as much as a lot of progress has been made globally in research and application of GIS enhanced modelling techniques in biomass and solid waste supply chains, developing nations have trailed behind. This explains why spatial and temporal waste or biomass statistics are not readily available in these areas. This paper reviews recent developments in the application of GIS in biomass and solid waste supply chain models, with the ultimate objective of identifying the gaps and opportunities that exist. It is especially biased towards the use of the biomass and waste in renewable or waste to energy schemes-a fast growing field within the green economy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-106
Number of pages11
JournalDetritus
Volume6
Issue numberJune
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal
  • Environmental Chemistry

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